Call for Service Provider Professionals!

By Two Way Street’s Editorial Team

In an attempt to create a “safe space” for employees working under institutional constraints who want to share their thoughts and opinions as private citizens, Two Way Street has carved out space in our paper to publish professionals’ experiences and reviews of our community’s Continuum of Care. Contributors can have these comments remain anonymous if they would like.

In an attempt to create a “safe space” for employees working under institutional constraints who want to share their thoughts and opinions as private citizens, Two Way Street has carved out space in our paper to publish professionals’ experiences and reviews of our community’s Continuum of Care. Contributors can have these comments remain anonymous if they would like.

A couple of key questions Two Way Street’s Editorial Team would like to answer include:

— How do we define homelessness and how do those definitions limit who and how particular populations are served?

— How do we establish a stronger referral system between institutions? n How do we better coordinate housing, services, and employment to ensure clients’ stability and ladder of upward mobility?

— How do we overcome the “scarcity mindset” that exists among most service providers and most organizations that comprise the local Continuum of Care?

— How do we serve populations that are currently not being served because of the limitations surrounding funding sources?

— How much of service provisioning to address homelessness should be professionalized and how much can be addressed by average citizens? We have heard from preliminary interviews with case managers and service coordinators that many of their clients are not going on to find employment and/or reintegrating with their community.

— What are some of the challenges and strategies to doing more of this? We have heard from preliminary interviews with service coordinators that they work with folks after they have found housing, whereas we have heard from case managers and parole officers that they often work with clients throughout the whole housing process.

— How much are these efforts coordinated? How can an organization like Two Way Street work more closely with both to help people find employment and reintegrate into their community?

— How do we create a narrative of “reintegration into a community” rather than just “housing first”?

For more information on these publishing opportunities, please email Two Way Street’s Editorial Team at [email protected]

An inspirational panel of local service provider and housing experts spoke after the Guild’s presentation of The Advocates (a documentary about homelessness in Los Angeles). Two Way Street is thankful to have the opportunity to work with many of these experts to incrementally chip away at these systemic issues that impact all our lives – no matter how visible or invisible. From left to right: Ilse Biel (Community Advocate and member of the Tiny Home Village Project), Laura Combs (Executive Director of ABQ Family Promise), Kevin Arthun (Creator of the ABQ Coordinated Resource Guide sponsored by the New Mexico Coalition to End Homelessness), Linda Simon (Consultant for Sandoval County’s Permanent Supportive Housing Program), Debbie Johnson (Founder of Tenderlove Community Center), Anita Cordova (Chief Advancement Officer of Albuquerque Healthcare for the Homeless), Dennis Plummer (CEO of Heading Home), and KC Quirk (Detention Facility Management Facilitator Oversight of Bernalillo County) Photo: Two Way Street’s Editorial Team

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